Hayden Falls Park is a small wooded area that butts up against the Scioto River. There is a small stream that flows through the    park and drains into the Scioto River. There is a wooden boardwalk that follows along the stream to prevent people from walking through the woods and damaging the landscape. Hayden Falls Park is actually considered a watershed. This is an area of land in which  all water drains to a common lake or stream, the Scioto River in this case. The city of Columbus is actually protecting this area. This helps control erosion, maintain quality drinking water sources, and provide a healthy habitat for animals and plants.

Location: The red marker pinpoints the exact location of the Hayden Falls metro park.

4326 Hayden Run Rd
Dublin, OH 43017

Source: Apple Maps

PLANTS

Common name: Pawpaw
Scientific name: Asimina triloba

Fun Fact: The Pawpaw was originally native to the eastern United States, but the Native Americans spread it all the way west to Kansas and as far south as the Gulf of Mexico. It produces a large fruit that is rich in amino acids that humans require.

Source: 1

Common Name: Norway Maple
Scientific Maple: Acer Platanoides

Common Name: Slippery Elm
Scientific Name: Ulmus rubra

Fun Fact: Slippery Elm was used by soldiers during the American Revolutions to heal gunshot wounds. It can also be used to heal numerous other aliments, including fever and sore throat.

Source: 1

Common Name: Fragrant Sumac
Scientific Name: Rhus aromatica

Fun Fact: Some Native American tribes used the plant’s astringent power to stop bleeding in numerous forms, from flesh wounds to hemorrhage after child birth.

Source: 1

Common Name: Burning Bush
Scientific Name: Euonymus alatus 

Fun Fact: The berries, bark, seeds, and leaves are suspected of being poisonous because there are many closely-related species that are poisonous. Due to this, dogs, cats, small children and livestock should be kept away from the plant.

Source: 1

Common Name: False Sunflower
Scientific Name: Heliopsis helianthoides

Common Name: Common Chicory
Scientific Name: Chichorium intybus 

Common Name: Spotted touch-me-not
Scientific Name: Impatiens capensis

I realize that the touch-me-nots are an extra plant, but I got so excited when I found it at this park because it is my favorite plant that we have came across in this class thus far. They made me so happy that I even brought some of them home for my roommate to squeeze so that she could understand what I was talking about while trying to describe this plant.

Common Name: Poison Ivy
Scientific Name: Toxicodendron radicans

Identification: “Leaves of three, let them be!” Poison ivy usually had a larger leaf at the end of the stem, with two smaller leaves jutting out in an opposite arrangement. The leaves can either be smooth or with small teeth around the edges, and they taper to a point. The two smaller leaves grow directly from the stem. The leaves can be red in the spring and range from dark green to bight green, turning yellow in the fall. If the plant has berries, they would appear white or a light yellow.

Source: 1 2

Species list

Angiosperm (Flowering Plants)

Anacardiaceae (Cashew Family)

Toxicodendron radicans. (L.) Kuntze. Poison ivy. Native shrub. CC=1

Rhus aromatica. Aiton. Fragrant Sumac. Native Shrub. CC=3

Solidago altissima. L. Canada goldenrod. Native herb. CC=1

Annonaceae (Custard Apple Family)

Asimina triloba. (L.) Dunal. Pawpaw. Native tree. CC=6.

Apiaceae (Carrot Fmaily)

Daucus carota. L. Wild carrot. Non-native forb.

Asteraceae (Sunflower Family)

Ambrosia artemisiifolia. L. Common ragweed. Natuve herb. CC=0

Cichorium intybus. L. Common chicory. Non-native herb.

Echinaceae purpurea. (L.) Moench. Purple coneflower. Non-native forb.

Erigeron strigosus. Willd. Prarie fleabane. Native forb. CC=4.

Eupatorium perfoliatum. L. Boneset. Native Forb. CC=4

Heliopsis helianthoides. (L.) Sweet. False Sunflower. Native forb. CC=5.

Polymnia canadensis. L. Rayless leafcup. Native forb. CC=5.

Symphyotrichum laeve. (L.) G. L. Nesom. Smooth aster. Native Forb. CC=3.

Taraxacum officinale. F. H. Wigg. Common Dandelion. Non-native Herb.

Balsaminaceae (Balsam Family)

Impatiens Capensis. Meerb. Spotted touch-me-not. Native herb. CC=2.

Cannabaceae (Hemp Family)

Celtis occidentalis. L. Common hackberry. Native Tree. CC= 4.

Caprifoliaceae (Honeysuckle Family)

Lonicera maackii. (Rupr.) Herder. Amur Honeysuckle. Non-native shrub.

Celastraceae (Bittersweet Family)

Euonymus alatus. (Thunb.) Siebold. Burning bush. Non-native shrub.

Cupressaceae (Cypress Family)

Juniperus virginiana. L. Eastern red cedar. Native cedar. CC=3.

Fabaceae (Pea Family)

Cercis canadensis. L. Eastern redbud. Native tree. CC=3.

Juglandaceae (Walnut Family)

Juglans nigra. L. Black Walnut. Native tree. CC=5.

Moraceae (Mulberry Family)

Fatoua vilosa. (Thunb.) Nakai. Mulberry weed. Non-native Forb.

Morus australis. L. White mulberry. Non-native tree.

Oleaceae (Olive Family)

Fraxinus nigra. Marshall. Black ash. Native tree. CC=7.

Plantaginaceae (Plantain Family)

Plantago major. L. Common plantain. Non-native forb.

Platanaceae (Plane Tree Family)

Platanus occidentalis. L. American sycamore. Native Tree. CC=7.

Poaceae (Grass Family)

Eleusine indica. (L.) Gaertn. Goosegrass. Non-native grass.

Elymus hystrix. L. Bottlebrush Grass. Native grass. CC=5

Elymus virginicus. L. Virginia wild-rye. Native grass. CC=4.

Phalaris arundinacea. L. Reed canary grass. Native grass. CC=0

Setaria viridis. (L.) P. Beauv. Green foxtail grass. Non-native grass.

Triticum aestivum. L. Wheat. Non-native grass.

Polygonaceae (Buckwheat Family)

Persicaria longiseta. (Bruijn) Kitag. Lady’s thumb. Non-native forb.

Rosaceae (Rose Family)

Rosa multiflora. Thunb. Ex Murray. Multiflora rose. Non-native. Subshrub/vine.

Sapindaceae (Soapberry Family)

Acer negrundo. L. Boxelder maple. Native Tree. CC=3.

Scrophulariaceae (Figwort Family)

Verbascum thapsus. L. Common mullein. Non-native forb.

Ulmaceae (Elm Family)

Ulmus americana. L. American elm. Native tree. CC=2

Urticaceae (Nettle Family)

Pilea pumila. (L.) A. Gray. Clearweed. Native herb. CC=5.

Verbenaceae (Verbena Family)

Verbena hastata. L. Blue Vervain. Native Forb. CC=4

Vitaceae (Grape Family)

Vitis riparia. Michx. Riverbank Grape. Woody vine. CC=3.

Gymnosperms

Cupressaceae (Cypress Family)

Juniperus virginiana. L. Eastern red cedar. Native cedar. CC=3.

I = the FQAI score= 85/5=17

Low CC

Phalaris arundinacea. L. Reed canary grass. Native grass. CC=0

The leaves are rolled in the bud. The leaves are flat and hairless, with a rough feeling along the edges. The stems are smooth, round and erect. Reed canarygrass contains several potentially toxic alkaloids. Poisonings have been reported in New Zealand and Norway for sheep that have fed on reed canarygrass, resulting in a condition referred to as “phalaris staggers”.

Source: https://www.oardc.ohio-state.edu/weedguide/single_weed.php?id=20

Toxicodendron radicans. (L.) Kuntze. Poison ivy. Native shrub. CC=1

Identification: “Leaves of three, let them be!” Poison ivy usually had a larger leaf at the end of the stem, with two smaller leaves jutting out in an opposite arrangement. The leaves can either be smooth or with small teeth around the edges, and they taper to a point. The two smaller leaves grow directly from the stem. The leaves can be red in the spring and range from dark green to bight green, turning yellow in the fall. If the plant has berries, they would appear white or a light yellow. Posion ivy isn’t really poisonous, but when John smith published the first writer account of the plant in 1624, the “poison” nickname stuck.

Source: 1 2 3

High CC

Platanus occidentalis. L. American sycamore. Native Tree. CC=7.

The leaves on this tree are alternate and simple, with toothed edges. This tree is super easy to recognize because the farther up the tree you look, the lighter-almost white- it appears after the dark bark has flaked away. Native Americans used the wood to for dugout canoes, because it is sturdy and durable, yet easy to work. (Source: https://homeguides.sfgate.com/sycamore-trees-40884.html )

Asimina triloba. (L.) Dunal. Pawpaw. Native tree. CC=6.

The leaves on this tree are large and toothless, with an alternate arrangement. The plant is either a shrub or small tree. It produces large, banana-like fruits that can be eaten raw or made into desserts. The Pawpaw was originally native to the eastern United States, but the Native Americans spread it all the way west to Kansas and as far south as the Gulf of Mexico. It produces a large fruit that is rich in amino acids that humans require.

Source: 1

These were the species that I found the most interesting at the top and bottom of my species list, so that is why I choose to set forth pictures and descriptions of these 4 plants.

Lichens

Common Name: Common Greenshield Lichen
Scientific Name: Flavoparmelia caperata

Common Name: Rough Speckled Shield Lichen
Scientific Name: Punctelia rudecta

Mosses

Bryum

Leskea